Day: March 3, 2019

A Guide To Power Tools

Power tool users frequently assume that they know everything there is to know about power tool safety. However, power tools can be extremely dangerous if used improperly. The Consumer Product Safety Commission conducted a survey in 2003 that blamed workshop and indoor power tools for an average of 400,000 emergency room visits a year. This total does not even include injury from tools such as backhoes, mowers and weed trimmers. Statistics such as these show the grim side of power equipment usage and make the need for power equipment safety even more evident. This article is designed to present consumers with a summary of basic safety procedures and safeguards associated with power equipment usage.

Riverside (and the Inland Empire in general) is populated with many manufacturing facilities that are often prone to power tool accidents. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recognizes the high number of power equipment injuries that occur every year, and have therefore established regulations on power equipment operation and safety. These regulations fall under Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act (also known as the General Duty Clause), published in Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1926, Subpart I. This clause requires employers to provide a work environment that is free from the recognized hazards that would harm or kill an employee. In order to limit the chance of power tool injuries, these OSHA guidelines should be followed by any individual using power equipment, and not just those in the work place. If you have been injured while using a power tool, it is imperative that you contact an experienced injury lawyer to review your situation. A Riverside personal injury attorney will be able to determine if the power tool used has any design flaws that prevent it from being safe to use. Additionally, if you were injured in the workplace, an attorney would be able to investigate whether all of the OSHA safety guidelines were being followed.

The word “power equipment” usually applies to the types of tools that are powered by one of the following power sources: electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic, and powder-actuated. However, as portable, electric hand tools become more and more powerful and popular, the same precautions should be taken when operating these devices.

After reviewing government injury and death statistics, accident case reports and newspaper accounts, Forbes.com reported that the most dangerous are those that include blades, such as circular saws, table saws, chainsaws, riding lawn mowers, wood chippers. However, tools that drill or puncture were also reported to be extremely dangerous. Individuals using these tools should make sure that the tools are equipped with automatic shutoff features and guards. With all power tools, however, it is important to identify ways to prevent injury through the proper use of tools and the appropriate use of protective equipment.

As instructed in the OSHA regulations mentioned above, the following general precautions should be observed in order to prevent injury from power tool usage:

Power equipment should not be carried by their cord or hose. Do not yank the cord or hose to disconnect it from a receptacle. If the tool has a three-prong plug, it should be plugged into a three-hold electrical receptacle. If an adapter is used to use a two-prong receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known ground. If you are using an extension cord, make sure it is a heavy duty cord, and do not use indoor rated cords outside. Cords and hoses should be kept away from oil, heat, and sharp edges. When tools are not being used, they should be disconnected, whether they are being stored, being serviced, cleaned, or when accessories are being changed. Individuals not using the power tool should keep a safe distance from the work area to avoid getting hit by flying particles. Use clamps or a vise to secure the project so that both hands are free to operate the tool. Do not hold fingers on the power switch when carrying around a tool. Cutters and blades should be kept sharp, clean, and properly maintained for their best and safest performance.

Never use bent, broken, or warped blades or cutters. In addition, the work area should be well lit and clean. Instruction manuals must be followed when lubricating power tools and changing tool accessories. Strong footing and good balance should be maintained when using power tools, and non-slip footwear is recommended. Avoid loose clothing, ties, jewelry, or anything else that could potentially become caught in a power equipment moving parts. Long hair must be tied back. Individuals who use power tools are exposed to the inherent dangers of falling, flying, abrasive, and splashing objects, or to harmful dusts, fumes, mists, vapors or gases. Therefore, safety glasses or goggles with side shields must be worn to protect the eyes against these flying particles. Use a dust mask for dusty operations and hearing protection if you will be using the tool for an extended period of time. Power equipments should be stored when not in use so as to not cause accidental injury. Be sure to dispose of damaged power tools, or clearly label them as damaged.

One of the most important precautions that should be taken is to make sure that the exposed moving parts of the power tool is covered and safeguarded, including belts, gears, shafts, pulley, sprockets, spindles, drums, flywheels, and chains. The greatest hazard of power tools, however, is electric shock, so make sure the tool is properly grounded before it is powered on. Also, it is dangerous to use power tools in damp or wet locations, as moisture helps electricity flow more easily through the body. This is one of the reasons rubber gloves and footwear are recommended when working outdoors when it is wet or damp.

Categories: Business

Scrap Metal – Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals

Two Types of Metal, Ferrous and Non-Ferrous

When you talk about scrap metal, there are two different types that are regularly referred to; Ferrous, and Non-Ferrous metals. In this article you’ll understand the basic differences between these metals, how to determine the differences for yourself, and some resources where to find them.

Ferrous Metals
We’ll first discuss ferrous metal. Ferrous metal is mostly used for things like machinery, cars, motors, farm implements, and other uses such as appliances, like stoves refrigerators, washers, dryers, and freezers. Lawn mowers are usually made from a combination of both ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Most of your smaller push type mowers, generally speaking, the motors are usually made from aluminum (a non-ferrous metal); however, the deck and handle assembly are made from ferrous metals.Click scrap metal.

How to Determine if the Metal You Are Looking at is Ferrous or Not

Two of the best ways to discern if a piece of metal you are looking at is made of ferrous metals or not are these: Does a magnet stick to it? And, if it’s an older piece of metal, is there any rust on it?

Does a magnet stick to it?
The biggest ingredient in ferrous metal is iron, or iron ore, which is a very magnetic material. Therefore, if you always carry a magnet around with you, you’ll know immediately if the piece of metal is ferrous or not. Of course, there are exceptions to every rule, and stainless steel (another non-ferrous metal) is one of those exceptions. Even though the main component for making steel itself is iron, high quality stainless steel has a high amount of nickel in it (another non-ferrous metal) and, therefore, a magnet will not stick to it.

Is there any rust on it?
The second and usually more common way to determine whether the metal you have just found is ferrous or not is if you can visibly see any rust anywhere on the item. Rust will especially be more prevalent on any areas that were touching the ground. Obviously, if an old piece of ferrous metal has been left out in the elements, it’s usually covered in rust, as a rule. Non-ferrous metals do not rust. They do, however, sometimes oxidize. We’ll discuss that later in this article.

Scrap Metal Buyers Should Always Carry a Magnet
Non-ferrous metals (and there quite a few to discuss here) usually do not contain any, or only small traces, of iron, and thus are not magnetic. If you are into scrap metal recycling or are thinking or starting a scrap metal business, one of your very best friends should be a magnet. I recommend using one that is on a chain, and one that has VERY strong magnetic charge, because that is what you’ll see all the people at the scrap yards using. A weak magnet can sometimes fool you, because you are strong, and the magnet is weak, you can touch it quickly and pull it away quickly, and think that you have a piece of non-ferrous metal when in fact the metal you just found is actually ferrous metal. That is also the reason that I recommend that your magnet should dangle from a chain, simply waving the magnet in front of a ferrous piece of metal will cause the magnet to “sway” or be “influenced” by the ferrous metal in some way.

Non-Ferrous Metals
As opposed to its ferrous counter parts, non-ferrous metals, as mentioned earlier, do not rust. However, some non-ferrous metals do oxidize. Oxidation is the process where there is a layer formed on the outside of a piece of metal. Aluminum is one metal in particular that tends to oxidize rather than rust. Interestingly enough, it is roughly the same process; however, with the lack of iron contained in the metal, the oxidation looks white and flaky as opposed to reddish and porous looking.